Contributors

Dr Justine Firnhaber-Baker,

Senior Lecturer in Medieval History at the University of St Andrews. General Editor, The Mediaeval Journal. Editor-in-Chief, St Andrews Studies in French History & Culture. Member of the St Andrews Institute for Medieval Studies.

Dr Firnhaber-Baker took part in an interview for this project, which focussed mainly on the dynasties of Medieval France. In the course of our conversation we explored dynasties legitimate their rule, how various dynastic factions in France competed for power and the role of dynasties in motivating peasant violence during the Jacqueire Revolt of 1358.

 

Professor Alison Beach,

Professor of Medieval History at the University of St Andrews. Co-President and Trustee, Association of Members of the Institute for Advanced Study (AMIAS), Princeton, NJ.

Professor Beach took part in an interview for this project, which focussed on a broad range of topics, but centrally on the dynasties of Medieval Swabia and their interaction with several monasteries, most notably the monastery of Petershausen. We also explored how dynastic genealogies can be appropriated and misused, the role of dynastic women within monasteries and how monasteries assisted in the preservation of dynastic ‘memoria’.

 

Professor Michael Brown,

Professor of Scottish History at the University of St Andrews. Member of the St Andrews Institute for Medieval Studies.

Professor Brown took part in an interview for this project, which focussed on the Earldom of Douglas. We covered the dynasty’s origins, development and collapse. We also discussed the role of violence in the legitimation of the dynasty’s power as well as exploring the iconography and propaganda of the Douglases and their relationship to the Scottish crown.

 

Dr Adham Saouli

Senior Lecturer in International Relations and Director of Teaching for International Relations at the University of St Andrews. Editor of Disruptions, Edinburgh University Press.

Dr Saouli took part in an interview for this project, which focussed on Middle Eastern State formation. During our conversation we discussed the role of dynasties in Middle Eastern state formation in the 19th century and why several royal dynasties collapsed in the 20th century. We also briefly touched on the discourses used by dynasties as well as those opposed to them, civil military relations in the gulf monarchies and the concept of fitna.

 

Professor Frank Müller

Professor of Modern History at the University of St Andrews. Member of the St Andrews Institute for Transnational & Spatial History and the Museums, Galleries & Collections institute. Produced the project: Heirs to the Throne in the Constitutional Monarchies of 19th Century Europe 1815-1914.

Professor Müller took part in an interview for this project, which focussed on European dynasties in the long 19th century. We discussed how the role of monarchic dynasties changed in response to political and cultural developments and how monarchies adapted to the advent of mass media. We also discussed dynastic propaganda, how royals saw themselves in the 19th century and the importance of the heir to the throne to dynastic politics.